IRS Announces 3 More Campaigns for 53 Total

Yesterday, the Large Business & International (“LB&I”) section of the IRS announced 3 more campaigns.  Our previous post about the campaigns can be found here.

The new campaigns are focused on international and transfer pricing related issues. They are:

Captive Services Provider Campaign

Practice Area: Treaty and Transfer Pricing Operations

Lead Executives: Jennifer Best, director, Treaty and Transfer Pricing Operations; and John Hughes, director, Advanced Pricing and Mutual Agreement

The section 482 regulations and the OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines provide rules for determining arm’s length pricing for transactions between controlled entities, including transactions in which a foreign captive subsidiary performs services exclusively for the parent or other members of the multinational group.

The arm’s length price is determined by taking into consideration data available on companies performing functions, employing assets, and assuming risks that are comparable to those of the captive subsidiary.

Excessive pricing for these services would inappropriately shift taxable income to these foreign entities and erode the U.S. tax base. The goal of this campaign is to ensure that U.S. multinational companies are paying their captive service providers no more than arm’s length prices. The treatment streams for this campaign are issue-based examinations and soft letters.

Offshore Private Banking Campaign

Practice Area: Withholding & International Individual Compliance

Lead Executive: John Cardone, director of Withholding & International Individual Compliance

U.S. persons are subject to tax on worldwide income from all sources including income generated outside of the United States. It is not illegal or improper for U.S. taxpayers to own offshore structures, accounts, or assets. However, taxpayers must comply with income tax and information reporting requirements associated with these offshore activities.

The IRS is in possession of records that identify taxpayers with transactions or accounts at offshore private banks. This campaign addresses tax noncompliance and the information reporting associated with these offshore accounts. The IRS will initially address tax noncompliance through the examination and soft letter treatment streams. Additional treatment streams may be developed based on feedback received throughout the campaign.

Loose Filed Forms 5471

Practice Area: Withholding & International Individual Compliance

Lead Executive: John Cardone, director of Withholding & International Individual Compliance

Form 5471, Information Return of U.S. Persons With Respect to Certain Foreign Corporations, must be attached to an income tax return (or a partnership or exempt organization return, if applicable) and filed by the return’s due date including extensions. Some taxpayers are incorrectly filing Forms 5471 by sending the form to the IRS without attaching it to a tax return (or partnership or exempt organization return, if applicable).

If a Form 5471 is required to be filed and was not attached to an original return, an amended return with the Form 5471 attached should be filed. The goal of this campaign is to improve compliance with the requirement to attach a Form 5471 to an income tax, partnership or exempt organization return.

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As with the other campaigns, if you are a taxpayer under LB&I’s jurisdiction and your return involves identified issues, it would be advisable to anticipate an audit and act accordingly.

Changes Proposed to US Tax Reporting Rules for “Outbound” Transfers

On January 30, 2013, the US Treasury Department (IRS) proposed amendments to existing gain recognition agreement (“GRA”) regulations that apply to US persons who transfer stock of a US corporation or a foreign corporation to a foreign corporation. The proposed changes to the GRA regulations address the consequences to US persons for failing to file GRAs and related documents (failure to file), to comply in any material respect with the terms of, or rules governing, GRAs (failure to comply), or to satisfy other reporting obligations. The proposed changes would affect not only future reorganizations and contributions of stock to foreign corporations, but also prior transfers that continue to be subject to GRA reporting. The proposed changes also provide similar failure to comply rules with respect to liquidating distributions to foreign corporations and certain other document filing requirements arising with a US person’s transfer of stock or assets to certain foreign corporations.

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Fighting Back: Taxpayers Challenge State Tax Assessments Based on Contingent-Fee Transfer Pricing Audits

In today’s economic environment, it is no secret that many states face significant budget shortfalls. In response to these circumstances, certain state treasury departments have begun to propose new income tax assessments based on transfer pricing studies that they have “outsourced” to third-party audit firms, often on contingent-fee terms. These arrangements, however, have left many taxpayers concerned. A state department of revenue’s combination of broad powers to propose adjustments and enjoyment of significant deference from state trial courts has traditionally been tempered by an expectation that the department will carefully exercise its discretion in making its assessment. But taxpayers are left wondering whether this powerful check on what otherwise might be arbitrary or capricious assessments is effectively abandoned where that state turns to a third-party, operating without transparency and on a contingent-fee basis, to pursue assessments under a highly technical area of the law (i.e., transfer pricing) with which the state department of revenue may, itself, have only limited experience.

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